only search Kehilat Ariel

July August 2014 – Yeshua, the Most Famous Jew


Nu? News

Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue Newsletter

Volume 30, Number 6          July August 2014            Tammuz/Av  5774

 

**KA Music/Dance Team at SD County Fair, July 4

**Jonathan Settel in free concert, July 12

**SD Messianic Community Picnic on Mission Bay, August 3

**Sisterhood Retreat + Youth Camp in August

 

 

Yeshua, the Most Famous Jew

 

By Rabbi Barney Kasdan

 

Whether people love him, despise him or try to ignore him, there can be little doubt that Yeshua of Nazareth is the most famous Jew in history.  No one has had such international impact on the lives of people from various countries and cultures.  Yet we almost forget that Yeshua started his amazing religious movement in the Land of Israel among our Jewish people.  This charismatic rabbi and self-proclaimed Messiah has caused much controversy among many but also great attraction among others within the Jewish community.  Take for example the following quote from another famous Jew:

 

“As a child I received instruction both in the Bible and in the Talmud. I am a Jew, but I am enthralled by the luminous figure of the Nazarene . . . . No one can read the Gospels without feeling the actual presence of Jesus. His personality pulsates in every word. No myth is filled with such life. Jesus is too colossal for the pen of phrase-mongers, however artful. No man can dispose of Christianity with a bon mot (a witty remark).”

— Quote taken from “What Life Means to Einstein,” The Saturday Evening Post, October 26, 1929. Einstein was a physicist and professor at Princeton University. He lived from 1879-1955.

This fascination with Yeshua within the Jewish community has certainly grown stronger in recent years.  Why are an increasing number of contemporary Jews intrigued with this rabbi from Nazareth?

 

First, we can’t help but notice that the entire historical context of Yeshua is thoroughly Jewish.  He was born of a Jewish mother in the first century Land of Israel.  He was circumcised on the eighth day and dedicated in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem according to Jewish custom (Luke 2:21-38).  Yeshua grew up in a traditional kosher home, regularly attended his local synagogue and no doubt diligently studied his Jewish culture and faith (Luke 4:14-22).  The Gospels record the fact that he faithfully celebrated all the Jewish festivals such as Passover, Tabernacles and Hanukkah.  Like all observant Jews of that time, he spoke Hebrew (along with Aramaic) and often quoted the Tanakh (Hebrew Scriptures) as he taught the riches of the Torah.  It should not surprise us that Yeshua also looked like a “normal” member of the Jewish community.  He wore the traditional tzitzit/fringes on his garments (Matthew 9:20) and was even called “rabbi” by other esteemed rabbis (John 3:1-16).  With all due respect to the great Renaissance painters and Cecil B. DeMille movie depictions, Jesus was a traditional Jew!

We could say that a funny thing happened on the way to the 21st century.  The Jewish Yeshua was eventually transformed into the non-Jewish Jesus.  Yet we live in a day when many people, both Jews and Christians, are yearning to rediscover the Jewish Yeshua.  This has led many of us Jews to read carefully the original source material; not the religious books about the Middle Ages, but the New Testament written by Yeshua’s earliest Jewish followers.  Many of us find ourselves, like Albert Einstein, “enthralled” with the original understanding of Yeshua.

 

Besides the Jewish context of the Gospels, many are drawn to Yeshua because of his amazing message.  People from all nations have been captivated by the power and truth of the Messiah’s teaching.  The universal appeal of his message has attracted followers from all tribes and tongues of the world.  While some world religions and pagan expressions seem to teach violence and subjugation, Yeshua’s focus is love.  And not just an emotional sentimentality but on a self-sacrificing love that would even care for a potential enemy (Matthew 5:43-48).  He often emphasized the priority of shalom/peace because the God of Israel is the creator of such blessing (Matthew 5:9).  In addition to these universal values, Yeshua had much to say about some values that are of special significance to the Jewish people.  In Judaism, the concept of Tikkun Olam (repairing the world) is one of the highest priorities.  We are taught that the world, as good as it might be at times, is in a fallen state.  Part of our calling as Jews is to assist in repairing some of the problems of humanity.  No wonder that it is often Jewish people who are highly involved in a wide variety of humanitarian aid and benevolence projects.  After all, it’s a mitzvah (good deed or commandment).  I am sure that many of us from a Jewish background feel a strong connection to Yeshua as we consider his values.  The Gospels record his ministry to the Jewish crowds where he brought healing and feed the hungry multitudes.  He brought words of comfort to the grieving and hope to those who had lost all hope.  Yeshua’s message went beyond this present age on planet earth but it was inclusive of the heartfelt values of Tikkun Olam.  His life and teaching actually tied heaven and earth together as he said: “Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven” (cf. Matthew 5:16).

One of the most important values within the Jewish community is the love for the Torah/5 books of Moses.  It is highly unfortunate, in my estimation, that some Christian theologies either devalue or completely do-away with this part of the Bible.  I realize that not every part of the Torah relates to Christians, as the New Testament itself teaches.  But sadly this can confuse some of us on the Jewish side into thinking that Yeshua and the New Testament obliterate the Torah for Jewish people.  This is contrary to what Yeshua himself clearly taught when he said: “Do not think that I came to abolish the Torah or the Prophets; I did not come to abolish, but to fulfill” (Matthew 5:17).  It seems clear that most Jews are not going to consider a Messiah who does away with the Torah.  But many of us can appreciate a Messiah who will give us a deeper understanding of the Torah through the lens of the New Covenant.  Despite some of this confusion, many Jews resonate with the direct teachings of Yeshua.   As we read his words we find ourselves captivated by the spiritual depth and yet simple clarity of his Torah values.  Many of us Messianic Jews have found that he has the words of life which are perfectly consistent with a Jewish understanding of the whole of Scripture.  For these reasons a number of Jews from every generation have taken note of the rabbi from Nazareth.  I feel blessed to live in a day when more and more people are taking a fresh look at this most famous Jew of history.

**This article first appeared in the Jewish Voice Today magazine, July 2014.

 

Upcoming Events

 

July 4, KA Music and Dance Teams at SD County Fair.  Zemer Yeshua and Nagila B’ariel will give a special program in this open air concert.  Prime time on the 4th of July!  Bring the family and invite your friends to this great outreach event.

July 12, Saturday, 1pm.  Mid-Year Congregational Meeting.  We will be electing our new Board of Directors at this Oneg Luncheon hosted by our Youth Group.  KA members please make this a priority.

July 12, Saturday, 7:30 pm.  Concert with Jonathan Settel.  This international messianic recording artist will share his joyous music plus from his new CD.   Free event, love offering received.   Invite your friends!

July 17-20, UMJC International Conference in Chicago.  Join hundreds of messianic believers for this annual event.  The theme is “Limud—To Learn and To Teach” and there will be educational workshops, worship concerts with Marty and Misha Goetz and inspiring Shabbat services.  More info and registration at umjc.org.

August 3, Sunday, 11am-5pm.  SD Messianic Community Picnic.  We will have our annual get-together with Tree of Life Congregation and other Jewish organizations for a time of food, fellowship and games.  Meeting at De Anza Cove on Mission Bay.  Bring your picnic lunch, chair and your family for this fun event.

August 15-17, KA Sisterhood Retreat, Murrieta Hot Springs Conference Center. This will be a wonderful time with the messianic sisters in a nice retreat setting.  Special speaker is Jamie Lash from Jewish Jewels Ministry in Florida.  Call our office for more information.

August 23, Saturday, 10:30am. Bat Mitzvah of Abbey and Lindsay Mellado.  Join us as the sisters are called up to the Torah on this beautiful occasion.

August 29, Friday, 5pm- Sunset.  Shabbat at the Shores.  Join us for this great sunset service at La Jolla Shores on the grassy area by the main lifeguard tower.  Bring your dinner, a chair or blanket as we celebrate Shabbat together at this beautiful location.  Bring your surfboard for a 4pm surf session with the Rabbi at the checkered flag!

August 29 – September 1, Friday – Monday.  UMJC Regional Youth Camp in San Bernardino Mountains.  Make sure your teen attends this great gathering of youth from 10 different synagogues.  Lots of fun and adventure (can you say Paintball?) plus Bible studies and Shabbat services in God’s nature.  Still a few spaces available.   Contact Michael and Jeannie Stinton for details.

November 7-9, UMJC West Regional Conference in Las Vegas.  Save the date for this first-ever messianic Jewish event in Las Vegas.  Join 12 different messianic synagogues from around the west as we come together for music, Shabbat services and concert with Deborah Kline-Iantorno.  Don’t miss it!  Info at umjc.org.

 

Weekly Services

 

Shabbat Morning Services: at 3219 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., in Clairemont, Saturday, 10:30am. Join us for this uplifting time of worship, fellowship and study. Our current sermon series is “Treasures from the Torah” which is an in-depth study of the weekly parasha reading and how it relates to our walk with Yeshua.

Children Shabbat School: Our children join us for the first part of the service, then break for different classes. Classes for Nursery through High School which include a Bible lesson plus background on Jewish studies and Hebrew.

Dance Ministry: Dance Review Workshop is held every Shabbat, 9:30-10:25am in the upstairs Dance Room. All welcome to learn the dances for that day’s service!

Tuesday Minyan and Messianic Jewish Institute of San Diego:   Corporate prayer from 6:30-7:00 as we lift up Israel and the needs of our synagogue. Class from 7:00-8:30pm.  Current  class: “Chanting the Torah”.  We offer a certificate in Messianic Jewish Studies for those who complete 7 of these quality courses.  Summer break from July 22-August 26.

“The Core” Tuesday Youth Group:  Join this great group of teens for a fun time of games, nerf wars, etc. at 6:30pm then a youth oriented Bible study from 7:00-8:30pm.  Connect with other messianic youth!

“A Taste of Torah” Classes: Saturday 9:00-10:00am. This survey of the Torah class will take you through the parasha in one year. Currently in Bemidbar/Numbers.   A great way to learn the foundations of our faith!  There is also a Spanish Torah Study at this same time.  Contact Gabe Pacheco or Luciano Rivera for info.

Men’s Club:  All men are invited to this Monday evening group (2nd and 4th at KA) for connecting, dialogue and encouragement on vital issues that we deal with today.  Always some good discussion and study along with service projects for men to be involved with.   Also a group meets every Wednesday 5am.  Contact Frank Rosas or Rome Remigio for more information.

Sisterhood: This dynamic group of women meets monthly for study, friendship and service projects.   Call the KA office for the latest info on the next luncheon and meeting.  All women and daughters are welcome!

Messiah TV:  Check out our TV outreach program as we share Mashiach and the Jewish background of the New Covenant faith in Yeshua.   Seen cross-country!  Check your local cable listings and spread the word.

 

KA Leadership

 

KA Zekeynim/Elders                                                             Board of Directors

Barney Kasdan, Rome Remigio, Frank Rosas             Tovik Liberman, Ron Wallace, Alice Hoover,       

                                                                                                        Elliot Klayman

Shamashim/Servants

Luis Garibay                                                                              Paty Garibay

Eric Kragenbrink                                                  

Joanne Kragenbrink                                                            Deborah Remigio

Joan Savarese                                                                         Tony Savarese

Jeannie Stinton                                                                    Michael Stinton

Tovik Liberman                                                                   Colleen Liberman

Ron Wallace                                                                          Rene Wallace

 

Committee Coordinators

Audio: Gabe Pacheco                                                  CD Duplication: Luis Garibay

Dance: Sue Rubin                                                         Facilities: Jim Scarborough

International: Eddie & Yrena Niewald                     Music: Eric & Joanne Kragenbrink

Office: Jan Folb                                                             Oneg: Devorah Montelongo

Prayer: Patty Kolb                                                        Resource Center: Alice Hoover

Singles: Bob and Jeannette Haas                               Social Action: Eric Tauber

Translation: Paty Garibay                                           TV Outreach:  Lety Levy     

Ushers: Tony Savavese                                                Website: Rome Remigio

Youth/Education: Michael & Jeannie Stinton              

            

Havurot/Small Groups (connect with the community!)

Del Cerro, Tony & Joan Savarese, 2nd & 4th Fri, 6:30 pm. Cover dish.

UTC/La Jolla, Tovik & Colleen Liberman, 2nd & 4th  Weds. 7:00 pm.

Carlsbad, Eddie & Yrena Niewald, 2nd & 4th Thurs. 7:00 pm.

Bay Park, Mike and Sylvia Ferson, every Thurs. 10 am.

Yachad (Singles Fellowship), Bob & Jeannette Haas,   Various events planned.

Espanol, Luciano & Lucia Rivera,  every Weds, 6pm.                                                                

Sisterhood, monthly meeting.

San Marcos (women), every Tuesday, 10am.

Men’s Club, Rome Remigio every Wed, 5:00 am or 2nd and 4th Mondays at KA 7pm.

Hiking Havurah, Gabe Pacheco, 7am every Sunday at Cowles Mountain in SD.

Yuma, AZ, Alan and Pat Levy Andrews, every Fri, 6pm.

TijuanaBC, Yisrael and Aviva Vazquez,  1st, 2nd & 3rd Thurs plus last Friday 7pm.

Contact the KA office for more details and contact information.

 

 

 

 

 

Donate

 If you would like to send a special love gift donation for our work within the Jewish community, you can donate online at kehilatariel.org or send a check to:

 

Kehilat Ariel

P.O. Box 178755

San Diego, CA 92177

 

Did you know that there are many creative ways to invest in our Messianic ministry?   Consider designating part of your Will or create a Charitable Gift Annuity that not only blesses the work of God’s Kingdom but also provides a financial return.  Contact our office for more information.

Thank you! And may God return a special blessing to you as you bless our people! (Genesis 12:3)

 

Nu? News is published bi-monthly by Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue. We welcome your testimonies, poems, humor (no kvetches) or any creative submissions. Please email ka@kehilatariel.org

 

 

 

Jan Folb

Administrator

Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue

858.490.4355

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nu? News

Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue Newsletter

Volume 30, Number 5          May/June 2014            Iyar/Sivan  5774

 

**Shavuot Service, June 3

**Chagigat L’chaim B’Mashiach Drama at KA, June 27&28

**KA Music/Dance Team at SD County Fair, July 4

 

“Why Judaistic and Hellenistic Cultures Matter:

Salvation is from the Jews”

By Patricia Levy Andrews

 

The following was a research essay submitted for the recent MJTI class “Jewishness of the New Testament”

 

Rabbi, theologian, and philosopher Abraham Joshua Heschel contends that, “The vital issue for the Church is to decide whether to look for roots in Judaism and consider itself an extension of Judaism, or to look for roots in pagan Hellenism and consider itself as anantithesis to Judaism.” [1] The very real differences between Hellenism and Judaism have a direct impact upon one’s exegesis of the scriptures. By comparing the languages, cultures and theologies of each, the importance of a Hebraic approach to the scriptures becomes clear, as does the reality that the Christian church has adhered to a Hellenistic approach.

The Hellenistic View

Hellenistic religion is any of the various systems of beliefs and practices of the people who lived under the influence of ancient Greek culture during the Hellenistic period and the Roman Empire (c. 300 BCE to 300 CE). [2] Hellenist Stoic and Peripatetic philosophies each

planted cultural seeds that filtered into the Christian culture. Stoic theology holds that the world is ruled by judicious legislation, a principle of reason (logos). It teaches that humans should live in agreement with reason/nature because humans have the “seed-like reason” that is a part of the divine principle of reason within humans. Hence, “reason”, “rational thought”, and “logic” are buzzwords of the the Stoics, for whom virtue and apatheia (“without passions,” being without negative or disturbing emotions) are the chief goal. The Peripatetics concentrated their efforts on biology, natural science, and logic. [3] Analytical, logical, rational, unemotional, scientific thinking and philosophies prevailed within the polytheistic, syncretistic religious culture of Hellenism.  Heschel describes how the Hellenistic teachings of Marcion of Sinope in early church history effected the dejudaization of Christianity:

“The spiritual alienation from Israel is most forcefully expressed in the teaching of Marcion, who affirmed the contrariety and abrupt discontinuity between the God of the Hebrew Bible and the God whom Jesus had come to reveal. Marcion wanted a Christianity free from any vestige of Judaism. He saw his task as that of showing the complete opposition between the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels. Although in the year 144 of the Christian era the church expelled the apostle of discontinuity and anathematized his doctrines, Marcion remains a

formidable menace, a satanic challenge. In the modern Christian community the power of Marcionism is much more alive and widespread than is generally realized. Notwithstanding the work of generations of dedicated scholars who have opened up new vistas in the nderstanding of the history and literature of ancient Israel and their relation to Christianity, there is an abiding tendency to

stress the discontinuity between the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.” [4]

Heschel passionately responds to a modern quote that reflects Marcion’s influence on Christian theology, “… ‘for the Christian the Old Testament is not revelation, but is essentially related to God’s revelation in Christ as hunger is to food and despair is to hope … . The God

who spoke to Israel no longer speaks to us in the time of the new Covenant.’ Here is the spiritual resurrection of Marcion. Was not the God of Israel the God of Jesus? How dare a Christian substitute his own conception of God for Jesus’ understanding of God and still call

himself a Christian?” [ibid]

Antonia Tripolitis further describes Marcion’s anti-Hebraic doctrine, which obliterates the unity of the Shema, the monotheism of Judaism, and advocates “… the existence of two Gods who have nothing in common. One is the unknowable supreme God who is good and

merciful and the Father of Jesus Christ, and the other is the God of creation, the demiurge of the cosmos and subordinate to the superior God.” Furthermore, the Creator God is responsible for “… the world’s misfortune, evil, and death.” Marcion also held that, “The Christ sent by the superior God is not the one prophesied in the Old Testament.” And he believed that “ …the Jewish Messiah will come at some future time to restore the Jewish kingdom just as the prophets declared, but he has nothing to do with humankind’s salvation.” [5] Marcion’s theology certainly resembles the polytheistic nature of the Greek and Roman religions of his day.

Marcion was, and remains influential because, as Tripolitis explains, “Unlike other Gnostic teachers, Marcion proceeded to found a church. In general, Gnostic groups organized as schools in which the teachings were transmitted, interpreted, and kept secret. Marcion was

the first Gnostic to establish a church with an organization, liturgy, and Scripture that was very similar to that of the church of Rome. He was also the first to develop a New Testament canon, which included an abridged version of the Gospel of Luke and a modified version of the 10 Pauline letters. The Pastoral Epistles (1, 2 Timothy, and Titus) and the Epistle to the Hebrew were excluded.” [ibid]  This “divorce from all things Jewish” continued. “By 167 the enforced Hellenization of the Jews reached its peak; the Jews were compelled, under penalty of death ‘to depart from the laws of their fathers, and to cease living by the laws of God. Further, the sanctuary in Jerusalem was to be polluted and called after Zeus Olympius’ (II Macc. 6:1, 2).” [6]

The Hebraic View

In contrast, the Hebraic view is able to restore the natural, God given perspective to the scriptures. For example, Marvin Wilson uses the nature of the Hebrew language to describe the contours of Hebrew thought:

“Hebrew is a verb-based language. Therefore, Hebraic thought naturally prompts response and action. Marvin Wilson explains: “In Hebrew grammar, the position of emphasis is usually the beginning of the clause. Unfortunately, our English translation

of the Hebrew text does not always reveal this emphasis. So it should not be forgotten that Hebrew—unlike English—usually confronts the listener immediately with a verbal form. . . even before the subject itself is designated.” Wilson explains that “Laziness,

inertia, or passivity were hardly marks of the Hebrews’ lifestyle. Rather, the Hebrews were mainly a doing and feeling people. Thus their language has few abstract terms. Rather, Hebrew may be called primarily a language of the senses. The words originally

expressed concrete or material things and movements or actions which struck the senses or started the emotions. Only secondarily and in metaphor could they be used to denote abstract or metaphysical ideas.” [7]   In fact, in the Hebrew Bible abstract thoughts or immaterial conceptions are conveyed through material or physical terminology, for example, phrases such as “lift up the eyes” (to

look), “burn in one’s nostrils” (to be angry), “unstop someone’s ears” (to disclose or reveal something), “hard-heartedness” (to have no compassion), “stiff-necked” (to be stubborn), “gird your loins” (to ready or brace oneself), and “set one’s face to go” (to be determined to go). Moreover, Wilson informs us that “Hebrews liked the concrete and tended to avoid the abstract”, and “In Hebrew thought the essence of true godliness is tied primarily to a relationship not to a creed.” [ibid]  Not only that, but Wilson also compares stoic modern Western culture with that of the Hebrews:

“Modern man in the Western world thinks he has an image to defend. He is supposed to be macho and keep his cool. He is expected to be made of steel, always in control. He does not allow himself to become vulnerable by revealing much of his emotions. It is usually considered unmanly for him to cry. Yet Jesus, the exemplary man, wept (Luke 19:41; John 11:35). This display of emotion was in sharp contrast to the Greco-Roman world of the Stoics, who sought to be indifferent to pleasure or pain; they were determined never to submit or to yield; they were resolved to overcome their emotions and desires. The Hebrews, however, were a very passionate people; they did not hide or suppress their emotion.” [ibid] The Stoic subjugation of emotion could be said to be the perfect description of proper church behavior in some church circles today. Wilson also addresses another aspect of Hebrew culture, block logic:

“The use of what may be termed block logic is another important contour of Hebrew thought. Greek logic, which has to a large extent influenced the Western world, was different. The Greeks often used a tightly contained step logic whereby one would argue

from premises to a conclusion, each step linked tightly to the next in coherent, rational, logical fashion. The conclusion, however, was usually limited to one point of view—the human being’s perception of reality.  By contrast, the Hebrews often made use of block logic. That is, concepts were expressed in self-contained units or blocks of thought. These blocks did not necessarily fit together in any obviously rational or harmonious pattern, particularly when one block represented the human perspective on truth and the other represented the divine. This way of thinking created a propensity for paradox, antinomy, or apparent contradiction, as one block stood in tension—and often illogical relation—to the other. Hence, polarity of thought or dialectic often characterized block logic. … It is particularly difficult for

Westerners—those whose thought-patterns have been influenced more by the Greeks and Romans than by the Hebrews—to piece together the block logic of Scripture. For example, Pharaoh hardened his heart, but God hardened Pharaoh’s heart; God

is both wrathful and merciful; Jesus is the “Lamb of God” and the “Lion of the tribe of Judah”; Hell is the “blackest darkness” and the “fiery lake”; in weakness is strength; to find life, one must lose it; the way up (exaltation) is the way down (humility); and whoever comes to Jesus he will never drive away, yet no one can come “unless the Father draws him.” [ibid]   So, we see that Hellenistic based Christian theology and culture is largely intellectual, abstract and theoretical, whereas Hebraic-Semitic based Jewish culture and theology is

concrete, physical, and practical. Interestingly, the word we use to describe the study and understanding of God is itself Greek: “Theology (from Greek Θεός meaning “god” and λογία, – logy, meaning ‘study of’) is the systematic and rational study of concepts of deity and of the nature of religious truths…” [emphasis, mine] [8] Thus, it is unsurprising that “Theology has been particularly prominent in Christian thought…”, which is based in Hellenism, while from the Jewish perspective, “…the genius of Judaism has been directed more toward the practices of the faith than toward abstract speculation, more to what God would have men do than to what God is.” [9]

The Hellenistic lens focuses on beliefs about God, whereas the Hebraic lens zooms in on what God would have us do. The first often reaches closed-ended static conclusions; the second is organic, malleable, ever-changing. The first is based in faith and creed, the second, in relationship and action. The first comes predominantly from the mind, the second from the whole being. Greco-Roman language and culture obscure scripture, whereas Jewish language and culture elucidate scripture quite clearly. Heschel challenges us with a statement: “The extent of Christianity’s identification with the Hebrew Bible is a test of its authenticity as well as of Jewish authenticity. Lack of such identification lies at the heart of the malaise of Protestantism today.” [4]

________________________________________________________________________

[1] Marvin R. Wilson Our Father Abraham, Jewish Roots of the Christian Faith, p. 16,

– Abraham Heschel, The Insecurity of Freedom (New York: Schocken Books, 1972), pp.

169-70

[2] TimeMaps.com

http://www.timemaps.com/civilization/Hellenistic-period#culture]

[3] Professor Christine M. Thomas, Lecture Notes 2003 Religion and Western Civilization:

Ancient

•Patrick V. Reid, Readings in Western Religious Thought: The Ancient World, pp. 159-71 (New

York: Paulist, 1987).

•Margaret L. King, Western Civilization: A Social and Cultural History: Volume I: Prehistory–

1750: Brief Edition, pp. 84-92 (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2001).

“8 of “8

http://www.religion.ucsb.edu/faculty/thomas/classes/rgst80a/lectures/lec14.html]

[4] Heschel, Abraham Joshua (1955-01-01). Insecurity of Freedom (Kindle Locations

2858-2869). Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Kindle Edition.

[5] Antonia Tripolitis Religions of the Hellenistic-Roman Age, pp. 120-121 (Wm. B. Eerdmans

Publishing Co., 2002) Google Play eBook edition.

[6] Gafni, Isaiah. “Antiochus°.” Encyclopaedia Judaica. Ed. Michael Berenbaum and Fred

Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 2. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. 202-204. Gale Virtual

Reference Library. Web. 3 Dec. 2013.

[7] Wilson, Marvin R. (1989-04-01). Our Father Abraham: Jewish Roots of the Christian Faith

(pp. 137-150). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. Kindle Edition.

[8] Wordnetweb.princeton.edu. Retrieved 11-11-12.

[9] Jacobs, Louis, and Ellen M. Umansky. “Theology.” Encyclopaedia Judaica. Ed. Michael

Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik. 2nd ed. Vol. 19. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007.

694-699. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 19 Dec. 2013.

Document URL http://bit.ly/1beE7yZ

 

Upcoming Events

May 18, Sunday, 10am-4pm.  Friendship Walk and Israel Festival.  A great way to celebrate Yom Ha-Atzmaut Independence Day!  Many KA members will be walking to support special needs kids in SD and in Israel. Then thousands from the Jewish community will come together for the Israel celebration with music, food, dance and schmoozing.  At Nobel Athletic Fields in UTC.  Sign up for the Walk at friendshipwalksd.com/teamariel. 

June 3, Tuesday, 7:30pm.  KA Shavuot Service.  Come out for this joyous celebration of the giving of the Torah plus the giving of the Ruach/Holy Spirit.  There will be lots of music and dance as well as important liturgy for the holy day.  All this followed by our Mt. Sinai Ice Cream Social to celebrate the “milk of the Word.”  Invite a friend!  Remember to bring your UMJC Omer Offering to support the work of Messianic Judaism here and internationally.   Prayer Guides for the 50 Day Omer are at umjc.org.

June 13, Friday, 5pm- Sunset.  Shabbat at the Shores.  Welcome in the summer season with this great sunset service at La Jolla Shores on the grassy area by the main lifeguard tower.  Bring your dinner, a chair or blanket as we celebrate Shabbat together at this beautiful location.  Bring your surfboard for a 4pm surf session with the Rabbi at the checkered flag.

June 21, Saturday, 10:30am.  Shabbat Service with special Israeli speakers.  Simcha and Bella Davidov will share the latest update from their life and ministry in Israel.

June 27 & 28, Friday/ Saturday, 7 pm. Chagigat L’chaim B’mashiach Musical Drama at KA.  Come out for this creative presentation of how the Jewish holy days and history have many important lessons for us today.  A great program for all your Jewish and Christian friends.  Tickets available at KA services or through our office.  Don’t miss it! 

July 4, KA Music and Dance Teams at SD County Fair.  Zemer Yeshua and Nagila B’ariel will give a special program in this open air concert.  Prime time on the 4th of July!  Bring the family and invite your friends to this great outreach event.

July 12, Saturday, 7:30 pm.  Concert with Jonathan Settel.  This international messianic recording artist will share his joyous music plus from his new CD.   Free event, love offering received.   Invite your friends!

July 17-20, UMJC International Conference in Chicago.  Join hundreds of messianic believers for this annual event.  The theme is “Limud—To Learn and To Teach” and there will be educational workshops, worship concerts with Marty and Misha Goetz and inspiring Shabbat services.  More info and registration at umjc.org.

August 15-17, KA Sisterhood Retreat in Murietta.  This will be a wonderful time with the messianic sisters in a nice retreat setting.  Special speaker is Jamie Lash from Jewish Jewels Ministry in Florida.  Call our office for more information.

November 7-9, UMJC West Regional Conference in Las Vegas.  Save the date for this first-ever messianic Jewish event in Las Vegas.

 

Weekly Services

Shabbat Morning Services: at 3219 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., in Clairemont, Saturday, 10:30am. Join us for this uplifting time of worship, fellowship and study. Our current sermon series is “Treasures from the Torah” which is an in-depth study of the weekly parasha reading and how it relates to our walk with Yeshua.

Children Shabbat School: Our children join us for the first part of the service, then break for different classes. Classes for Nursery through High School which include a Bible lesson plus background on Jewish studies and Hebrew.

Dance Ministry: Dance Review Workshop is held every Shabbat, 9:30-10:25am in the upstairs Dance Room. All welcome to learn the dances for that day’s service!

Tuesday Minyan and Messianic Jewish Institute of San Diego:   Corporate prayer from 6:30-7:00 as we lift up Israel and the needs of our synagogue. Class from 7:00-8:30pm.  Current  MJTI class: “Rabbinic Literature”, which looks at the history, theology and culture of the Talmudic rabbis. Taught by Elliot Klayman.  $99 per student.  We offer a certificate in Messianic Jewish Studies for those who complete 7 of these quality courses. 

“The Core” Tuesday Youth Group:  Join this great group of teens for a fun time of games, nerf wars, etc. at 6:30pm then a youth oriented Bible study from 7:00-8:30pm.  Connect with other messianic youth!

“A Taste of Torah” Classes: Saturday 9:00-10:00am. This survey of the Torah class will take you through the parasha in one year. Currently in Vayikra/Leviticus.   A great way to learn the foundations of our faith!  There is also a Spanish Torah Study at this same time.  Contact Gabe Pacheco or Luciano Rivera for info.

Men’s Club:  All men are invited to this Monday evening group (2nd and 4th at KA) for connecting, dialogue and encouragement on vital issues that we deal with today.  Always some good discussion and study along with service projects for men to be involved with.   Also a group meets every Wednesday 5am.  Contact Frank Rosas or Rome Remigio for more information.

SisterhoodThis dynamic group of women meets monthly for study, friendship and service projects.   Call the KA office for the latest info on the next luncheon and meeting.  All women and daughters are welcome!

Messiah TV:  Check out our TV outreach program as we share Mashiach and the Jewish background of the New Covenant faith in Yeshua.   Seen cross-country!  Check your local cable listings and spread the word.

 

KA Leadership

 

KA Zekeynim/Elders                                     Board of Directors

Barney Kasdan, Rome Remigio,                                     Alice Hoover, Elliot Klayman

Frank Rosas                                                                        Tovik Liberman, Ron Wallace,                                                                                                 

 

Shamashim/Servants

Luis Garibay                                                                       Paty Garibay

Eric Kragenbrink                                                  

Joanne Kragenbrink                                                       Deborah Remigio

Joan Savarese                                                                   Tony Savarese

Jeannie Stinton                                                                Michael Stinton

Tovik Liberman                                                                               Colleen Liberman

Ron Wallace                                                                                      Rene Wallace

 

Committee Coordinators

Audio: Gabe Pacheco                                                    CD Duplication: Luis Garibay

Dance: Sue Rubin                                                            Facilities: Jim Scarborough

International: Eddie & Yrena Niewald                                   Music: Eric & Joanne Kragenbrink

Office: Jan Folb                                                                Oneg: Devorah Montelongo

Prayer: Patty Kolb                                                           Resource Center: Alice Hoover

Singles: Bob and Jeannette Haas                                              Social Action: Eric Tauber

Translation: Paty Garibay                                             TV Outreach:  Lety Levy     

Ushers: Tony Savavese                                                 Website: Rome Remigio

Youth/Education: Michael & Jeannie Stinton              

            

 

 

 

Havurot/Small Groups (connect with the community!)

Del Cerro, Tony & Joan Savarese, 2nd & 4th Fri, 6:30 pm. Cover dish.

UTC/La Jolla, Tovik & Colleen Liberman, 2nd & 4th  Weds. 7:00 pm.

Carlsbad, Eddie & Yrena Niewald, 2nd & 4th Thurs. 7:00 pm.

Bay Park, Mike and Sylvia Ferson, every Thurs. 10 am.

Oceanside, Frank and Marianne Rosas, every Fri, 6:30 pm.  Shabbat dinner.

Yachad (Singles Fellowship), Bob & Jeannette Haas,   Various events planned.

Espanol, Luciano & Lucia Rivera, every Weds, 6pm.                                                                

Sisterhood, monthly meeting.

San Marcos (women), every Tuesday, 10am.

Men’s Club, Rome Remigio every Wed, 5:00 am or 2nd and 4th Mondays at KA 7pm.

Hiking Havurah, Gabe Pacheco, 7am every Sunday at Cowles Mountain in SD.

Yuma, AZ, Allen and Pat Levy Andrews, every Fri, 6pm.

TijuanaBC, Yisrael and Aviva Vazquez, 1st, 2nd & 3rd Thurs plus last Friday 7pm.

 

Contact the KA office for more details and contact information.

 

 

Donate

 If you would like to send a special love gift donation for our work within the Jewish community, you can donate online at kehilatariel.org or send a check to:

Kehilat Ariel

P.O. Box 178755

San Diego, CA 92177

 

Did you know that there are many creative ways to invest in our Messianic ministry?   Consider designating part of your Will or create a Charitable Gift Annuity that not only blesses the work of God’s Kingdom but also provides a financial return.  Contact our office for more information.

Thank you! And may God return a special blessing to you as you bless our people! (Genesis 12:3)

 

 Nu? News is published bi-monthly by Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue. We welcome your testimonies, poems, humor (no kvetches) or any creative submissions. Please email ka@kehilatariel.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nu? News

Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue Newsletter

Volume 30, Number 4          March/April 2014            Adar II/Nisan  5774

 

**Purim Shpiel Celebration, March 15

**KA Passover Seder, April 15

 

What Can Christians Learn From The Jewish Holidays?

By Rabbi Barney Kasdan

 

We have witnessed many blessings in recent decades with the growth of the modern Messianic Jewish movement.  For us Jewish believers in Yeshua, it has provided a practical way to express our heritage through our messianic synagogues and our home life.  Many would agree that embracing Yeshua has increased our understanding and appreciation of the Jewish holidays.  But what about non-Jews within the messianic movement?   And what can Christians within the Church learn from the Jewish holidays?   I believe there are many vital lessons to be gleaned.

 

#1 The Jewish holidays reflect accurate shadows of the things of God. 

The New Testament says it this way: “So don’t let anyone pass judgment on you in connection with eating and drinking, or in regard to a Jewish festival or New Moon or Shabbat.  These are a shadow of things that are coming, but the body is of the Messiah” (Complete  Jewish Bible, Colossians 2:16-17).

I have heard numerous teachings on this passage that conclude that the Jewish festivals are now irrelevant.  It is true that we are not to judge others based on their observance (or non-observance) level of the feasts.  I believe some of the misunderstanding stems from mistranslation in this verse.  Many translations insert the phrase “mere” or “only” a shadow thus implying that the Jewish holidays are not worth much to Christians.  This is highly unfortunate especially when one realizes that those words are not in the original language.  Instead of denigrating the feasts, it seems that Shaul/Paul is actually underlining the truth that the feasts are positive shadows of God’s reality!  True, we do not venerate the holiday in itself.  But a shadow does indeed reflect a real object.  The Jewish holy days are not just cultural or sociological expressions of a people.  For Bible believers, these holy days present beautiful shadows of who our God is and what His plans are for this world.  Passover is more than matzah ball soup.  It reminds us of God’s work of redemption both from the slavery of Egypt as well as from the spiritual slavery of our sin.  Rosh Hashanah is more than the shofar/ram’s horn.  It is a wonderful shadow reminding us of the Messiah’s return.  Certainly there are many Christians who say we do not need these shadows.  But the irony is that they often substitute other shadows (holidays and customs) in their place.  I sincerely do not wish to judge anyone on such things but my point is that too often Christians have ignored the amazing shadows given by God to reflect His heart and His plans.

 

#2 The Jewish holidays model proper appreciation for the Jewish roots of the New Testament faith.

While the verse in Colossians reminds us to refrain from the judgment of others on these things, Shaul/Paul writes elsewhere about another reason for Christians to appreciate the Jewish culture.  He wrote to some non-Jewish believers who may have questioned the importance of this truth when he said: “You—a wild olive—were grafted in among them (Jewish believers) and have become equal sharers in the rich root of the olive tree, then don’t boast…remember that you are not supporting the root, the root is supporting you” (CJB Romans 11:17-18).  It is clear that the New Testament is not advocating a mandatory legalism in regards to Christians and the Jewish holidays.  But on the other hand, the New Testament does encourage all believers (non-Jewish included) to understand and appreciate the original context of their faith in Yeshua.  This messianic faith did not come from Athens or the Renaissance of Europe!  Since the olive tree is a biblical symbol of Israel (cf. Jeremiah 11:16), the message of the New Testament is undeniable rooted in the history and culture of Israel.  By studying and understanding the Jewish holidays, Christians can gain a fresh appreciation of their true spiritual roots.  If this had been the clear understanding in Church history, there certainly would have been a much better relationship between Christians and Jews.  A few years ago in a USA city, a rock was thrown through a window of a Jewish home where a Hanukkah menorah was clearly displayed.  This sad act of anti-Semitism was countered in a marvelous way.  In a show of solidarity, multiple Christian homes placed a Hanukkah menorah in their own windows.  When Christians understand the Jewish holidays, they invariably appreciate the Jewish roots of their own faith in Yeshua as Messiah.  This is not to be confused with a “replacement theology” where Christians replace Jews.  But I like to call it “appreciation theology” where Christians affirm their true origins.

 

#3  The Jewish holidays clarify the true Messiah.

If the Jewish festivals are given by God as a good shadow of spiritual realities, then it is quite logical that those holidays point us to the greatest reality of all; the coming Messiah.  Passover is a 3500 year old holiday celebrating redemption.  It cannot be a coincidence that it was at a seder  where Yeshua of Nazareth told his Jewish disciples that the meal was symbolic of his work for all of us;  the Lamb offered for the world (cf. Matthew 26).  It should not be surprising that Yeshua not only celebrated Hanukkah in Jerusalem but used that holiday to clearly proclaim his messiahship (cf. John 10).  The fact is that every Jewish/Biblical holiday is an amazing teaching tool that can draw us closer to our Redeemer.  In the Torah, the festivals are called “God’s Appointed Times” (Leviticus 23).  They are special times where God himself says He wants an appointment with you!  Put it on your calendar and don’t miss it.  All of us (Jews, Christians, Intermarried families) have so much to learn as we understand and celebrate the wonderful holidays given from above.

 

**If you would like to learn more about the Jewish holidays and how they relate to Yeshua, you can order a copy of Rabbi Kasdan’s popular bookGod’s Appointed Times.  Go to messianicjewish.net to pick up your copy or drop by the KA Resource Center.

 

Upcoming Events

 

March 15  Saturday, 7:00 pm. Purim Celebration. Come dressed in costume as we celebrate the story of Esther.  There will be an original shpiel/reading of the megillah and joyful music as we remember God’s faithfulness to our people.  In the spirit of Shlach Manot, please bring a non-perishable food item as we bless Jewish Family Service.

 

March 26-April1.  UMJC Dan to Beersheva Tzedaka Bike Tour.  Two KA members will join this amazing bike ride throughout Israel as they distribute tzedaka/financial aid to needy organizations.  If you would like to bless Israel in this practical way, you can donate through our website a gift designated “Israel Bike Tour”.  Todah rabah!

 

April 15, Tuesday, 6:30 pm. KA Passover Seder –  at the Town & Country Resort in Mission Valley. Make your reservation now for our annual celebration and be thinking of friends to invite to this unique service. We will read through the traditional Hagadah with lots of holiday music and folkdance.  $55 for adults, $25 for kids under 12.  Call our office for tickets or purchase on our website. Come celebrate the feast of our redemption!

April 16, Wednesday, 8:00 pm. Bikkurim Service (Resurrection of Messiah on the third day of Passover) Join us for this time of praise as we celebrate this biblical holy day in the context of our faith in Messiah.

April 26, Saturday, 10:30 am. Yom Hashoah Service. Join us as we remember the lessons of the Holocaust.

July 17-20, UMJC International Conference in Chicago.  Join hundreds of messianic believers for this annual event.  The theme is “Limud—To Learn and To Teach” and there will be educational workshops, worship concerts with Marty and Misha Goetz and inspiring Shabbat services.  More info and registration at umjc.org.

November 7-9, UMJC West Regional Conference in Las Vegas.  Save the date for this first-ever messianic Jewish event in Las Vegas.

 

Weekly Services

 

Shabbat Morning Services: at 3219 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., in Clairemont, Saturday, 10:30am. Join us for this uplifting time of worship, fellowship and study. Our current sermon series is “Treasures from the Torah” which is an in-depth study of the weekly parasha reading and how it relates to our walk with Yeshua.

Children Shabbat School: Our children join us for the first part of the service, then break for different classes. Classes for Nursery through High School which include a Bible lesson plus background on Jewish studies and Hebrew.

Dance Ministry: Dance Review Workshop is held every Shabbat, 9:30-10:25am in the upstairs Dance Room. All welcome to learn the dances for that day’s service!

Tuesday Minyan and Messianic Jewish Institute of San Diego:   Corporate prayer from 6:30-7:00 as we lift up Israel and the needs of our synagogue. Class from 7:00-8:30pm.  Current  5-week class: “Things Bubbe Used To Say”, wisdom from the world of Yiddish. New 10-week course starting March 25 “Highlights in the Book of Isaiah”.  Taught by Rabbi Kasdan.  $60 per student.  We offer a certificate in Messianic Jewish Studies for those who complete 7 of these quality courses.

“The Core” Tuesday Youth Group:  Join this great group of teens for a fun time of games, nerf wars, etc. at 6:30pm then a youth oriented Bible study from 7:00-8:30pm.  Connect with other messianic youth!

“A Taste of Torah” Classes: Saturday 9:00-10:00am. This survey of the Torah class will take you through the parasha in one year. Currently in Vayikra/Leviticus.   A great way to learn the foundations of our faith!  There is also a Spanish Torah Study at this same time.  Contact Gabe Pacheco or Luciano Rivera for info.

Men’s Club:  All men are invited to this Monday evening group (2nd and 4th at KA) for connecting, dialogue and encouragement on vital issues that we deal with today.  Always some good discussion and study along with service projects for men to be involved with.   Also a group meets every Wednesday 5am.  Contact Frank Rosas or Rome Remigio for more information.

Sisterhood: This dynamic group of women meets monthly for study, friendship and service projects.   Call the KA office for the latest info on the next luncheon and meeting.  All women and daughters are welcome!

Messiah TV:  Check out our TV outreach program as we share Mashiach and the Jewish background of the New Covenant faith in Yeshua.   Seen cross-country!  Check your local cable listings and spread the word.

 

 

KA Leadership

 

KA Zekeynim/Elders                                                          Board of Directors

Barney Kasdan, Rome Remigio, Frank Rosas                Tovik Liberman, Ron Wallace, Alice Hoover, Elliot Klayman

Shamashim/Servants

Luis Garibay                                                                    Paty Garibay

Eric Kragenbrink                                                 

Joanne Kragenbrink                                                     Deborah Remigio

Joan Savarese                                                               Tony Savarese

Jeannie Stinton                                                            Michael Stinton

Tovik Liberman                                                           Colleen Liberman

Ron Wallace                                                                Rene Wallace

Committee Coordinators

Audio: Gabe Pacheco                                                  CD Duplication: Luis Garibay

Dance: Sue Rubin                                                        Facilities: Jim Scarborough

International: Eddie & Yrena Niewald                        Music: Eric & Joanne Kragenbrink

Office: Jan Folb                                                             Oneg: Devorah Montelongo

Prayer: Patty Kolb                                                        Resource Center: Alice Hoover

Singles: Bob and Jeannette Haas                                 Social Action: Eric Tauber

Translation: Paty Garibay                                            TV Outreach:  Lety Levy

Ushers: Tony Savavese                                                Website: Rome Remigio

Youth/Education: Michael & Jeannie Stinton

Havurot/Small Groups (connect with the community!)

Del Cerro, Tony & Joan Savarese, 2nd & 4th Fri, 6:30 pm. Cover dish.

UTC/La Jolla, Tovik & Colleen Liberman, 2nd & 4th  Weds. 7:00 pm.

Carlsbad, Eddie & Yrena Niewald, 2nd & 4th Thurs. 7:00 pm.

Bay Park, Mike and Sylvia Ferson, every Thurs. 10 am.

Oceanside, Frank and Marianne Rosas, every Fri, 6:30 pm.  Shabbat dinner.

Yachad (Singles Fellowship), Bob & Jeannette Haas,   Various events planned.

Espanol, Luciano & Lucia Rivera,  every Weds, 6pm.                                                        

Tijuana, Yisrael and Aviva Vazquez,  1st, 2nd & 3rd Thurs plus last Friday 7pm.

Sisterhood, monthly meeting.

San Marcos (women), every Tuesday, 10am.

Men’s Club, Rome Remigio every Wed, 5:00 am or 2nd and 4th Mondays at KA 7pm.

Young Adults (21-40), various events planned.

Hiking Havurah, Gabe Pacheco, 7am every Sunday at Cowles Mountain in SD.

 

Contact the KA office for more details and contact information.

 

Donate

If you would like to send a special love gift donation for our work within the Jewish community, you can donate online at kehilatariel.org or send a check to:

Kehilat Ariel

P.O. Box 178755

San Diego, CA 92177

Thank you! And may God return a special blessing to you as you bless our people! (Genesis 12:3)

Nu? News is published bi-monthly by Kehilat Ariel Messianic Synagogue. We welcome your testimonies, poems, humor (no kvetches) or any creative submissions. Please email ka@kehilatariel.org